For many, there are times of year when work slows down a bit and you may find yourself outside of the office or working remotely on occasion, and as such not checking emails quite as frequently. When it comes to monitoring systems, often times there are situations where ELM Administrators don’t want to be inundated with a bunch of informational email traffic to sort through but at the same time need to make sure the important notifications, for example, a warning about low disk space on your Exchange server, or performance issues with your e-commerce web server, still do get to you quickly.

An alternative to sending email notifications within ELM is to combine the Mail Notification with SMS or Text Messages to be sent to your phone. After all, do you ever NOT have your phone with you? In this article we’ll take a look at how we go about accomplishing text message notifications using ELM.

Most cellular companies assign an email address to cellular phone numbers and support SMS or text messaging by email. You don’t need to install any special apps but the recipient needs to have texting on their cellular plan. And who besides maybe your grandma and grandpa doesn’t have texting on their cell plan anymore?

The major US cellular carriers use the 10 digit phone number combined with a unique domain for each respective company for an address. For example the most common carriers use these email domains:

Carrier: Sample Email Address

  • Alltel -> 1234567890@message.alltel.com
  • AT&T -> 1234567890@txt.att.net
  • Nextel -> 1234567890@messaging.nextel.com
  • Sprint -> 1234567890@messaging.sprintpcs.com
  • T-mobile -> 1234567890@tmomail.net
  • Verizon -> 1234567890@vtext.com (text only)
  • Verizon -> 1234567890@vzwpix.com (pictures and videos)

*Subject to change! Some companies may also offer aliases instead of using phone numbers for email.

Note that some carriers will break apart larger messages into 160 character messages, others will deliver only the first 160 characters. We discovered one instance where a carrier dropped the entire message due to exceeding the max characters allowed although this is believed to be uncommon. Please check with your provider on their specific policy.

Now, here’s how it looks in ELM’s Email Notification Method setup to deliver to a phone.

Email to Text 1

And here’s how a notification may look on Mike’s Phone.

Text Message Notification 1

To help clean up and trim down the message going to a phone it is always a good idea to check the box to “Compress White Space” on the Mail Message Options tab of the SMTP Notification Method.

Text Message Notification 2

There you have it – simple text message notifications!

One final note on using the email version of a phone number: Make sure to verify with the appropriate carrier what the email domain is that they use as it may change, sometimes without notice. It’s also a good idea to verify with the end recipient that they are OK with receiving text message notifications from ELM!

We hope that you found this article on How to Setup Text Message Notifications informative and useful and wish you continued success with ELM.